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Re: Trial job

brummondlarry
Active Member
Larry B Member Since: May 22, 2017
1 of 14

I'm new to Upwork. I submitted a proposal for a "Copywriter for personal finance website" and was offered a "trial" project for a (nominal) fixed price. Since it was my first Upwork job offer, I accepted, wrote a detailed web landing page. It was accepted and the money released. During the process, the company was very responsive to questions and follow up. Since finalizing the porject and my response that I'd like to work with them, I've heard nothing. Is this a "trick" to get writers to do something for little or nothing and then go on to the next "dupe"? Thanks for any input.

lysis10
Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
BEST ANSWER
2 of 14
datasciencewonk
Community Guru
Kat C Member Since: Jul 11, 2016
3 of 14

That client appears to have a plethora of ongoing contracts for the same job since at least December. 

 

Those are details I review when I consider contracting with a client. 

 

But, they also appear to be paying those FLs when you look at the number of hours being billed. 

 

So, no. I wouldn't take this as a scam.

 

They could very well be super busy with all of the other FL contracts they're managing. Or, maybe, it's not a good fit for them (though I don't have enough information to state that as 100% true, only the client does at this point). 

 

ETA: I also don't apply to jobs with so many FLs "needed." 

 

 

prestonhunter
Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
4 of 14

Larry:

Is it a "trick"? I don't know. Sort of yes, sort of no.

 

The client did not break any rules.

 

He asked you to do so something for a certain amount of money. You did it. He paid you the money. That's how Upwork works.

 

There are two possibilities:

 

- The client was telling the truth about having more work to do after this article, if he liked what you submitted. But when he saw what you submitted, it wasn't what he was looking for on a continuing basis.

 

[or]

 

- The client simply wanted to get you to write on article for a small payment. He never had any intention of offering an ongoing job.

 

EITHER WAY, the client played by the rules.

 

If any mistakes were made here, it was the original poster who made a mistake if he worked for less than he normally would because he thought that doing so would lead to a long-term position. That rarely pans out.

 

Personally, I never pay any attention to any client's talk of a "long-term job" after this one. I don't lower my rate for a small one-off job.

brummondlarry
Active Member
Larry B Member Since: May 22, 2017
5 of 14

Although it says I'm a member 4 hours ago, I've been submitting proposals for several weeks. That still makes me a newbie so I have no idea what FL's are. Obviously still learning what works and doesn't, what's a legitimate (decent paying) job from wanting "something for nothing" and expectations - like feedback on whether they liked what I did or not. I'd much rather hear "it wasn't what we needed" than the "sound of silence".

brummondlarry
Active Member
Larry B Member Since: May 22, 2017
6 of 14

Kat C, I got it, FL's - Freelancers. Sorry, just needed to read your post again.

 

Different comments are interesting: one side noting the overwhelming competition as  "dime a dozen writers" and others saying they're having lots of success. Many postings of frustrated FL's who can't get any jobs.

 

Two things stand out (so far): it takes a lot of work (i.e. perseverance) and the "secret" is learning what jobs to submit proposals on. Doesn't seem like we can rely on the budget posting as companies use the default $5.

 

You've been on Upwork almost a year so I'd love to know your "filters" - what jobs you bid on or won't bid on (such as "many FL's needed"). Much appreciated if you would share that, 

datasciencewonk
Community Guru
Kat C Member Since: Jul 11, 2016
7 of 14

@Larry B wrote:

Kat C, I got it, FL's - Freelancers. Sorry, just needed to read your post again.

 

Different comments are interesting: one side noting the overwhelming competition as  "dime a dozen writers" and others saying they're having lots of success. Many postings of frustrated FL's who can't get any jobs.

 

Two things stand out (so far): it takes a lot of work (i.e. perseverance) and the "secret" is learning what jobs to submit proposals on. Doesn't seem like we can rely on the budget posting as companies use the default $5.

 

You've been on Upwork almost a year so I'd love to know your "filters" - what jobs you bid on or won't bid on (such as "many FL's needed"). Much appreciated if you would share that, 


 Oh boy. That's not directed at you, it's just, I'm about to repeat myself again (so I have this internal eye rolling going on projected back at myself)...

 

1. Writing is, indeed, a saturated market. End. Of. Story. No amount of RAH RAH RAH YOU CAN DO IT, will change that fact. Find that UVP based on what YOU are comfortable writing about. 

 

2. Target a specific type of writing. You have about a gazillion different things listed in your profile overview. I'd choose three and then as your client base gains momentum, slowly layer in more...(yes, I'm exaggerating as it isn't a gazillion, but to a client, their brain will shut down very quickly; they want you to be straight to the point about your expertise).

 

3. We are all multidimensional, unique beings with more than a few skills. What I have listed on my profile is only a fraction of the expertise I possess. But, the pray and spray method doesn't work well for writing on this platform (if it works elsewhere, then so be it; but, Upwork is its own beast). Back to digital psychology for a moment, clients want to know your expertise in the blink of an eye. Make it easy for them. If you have additional skills, then sell that when you have an interview. 

 

4. You're going to need to figure out what works for you in terms of choosing clientele. I prefer a group of long-term clients (yes, my current jobs in progress are ongoing -- they send me work as they need it done) who don't onboard a smorgasbord of FLs all at once. I also refrain from working with clients who aren't my end client -- meaning there is a 3rd party involved. But, THIS IS JUST ME. Occasionally, I take the one and done approach. I don't know if I give off that client-FL monogamy vibe, clients tend to stick with me long term (again, there have been exceptions).

 

5. Not all FLs and clients are "soul mates" (I'm being cheeky). Some fit. Some don't. Some you just "date" for awhile. Too many seem to think all writing FLs are cheap dates. Or they attempt to lure FLs in with fantastical promises of future work (I like to think of it as, if you go home with me tonight, then maybe we can get married some day; no thanks guy, I'll pass). Others want to put that ring on your finger after only the first date. LOL. And others, well, you will want to break up with them. I'm sure you're experienced and already know this...I just wanted to get the analogy out of my brain and onto the screen.

 

Other experienced FLs in the writing genre might give their perspectives on how they filter clients. My approach is tailored to my goals/objectives, skillset, and current plus past client base. 

 

That's all I can think of for now. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

brummondlarry
Active Member
Larry B Member Since: May 22, 2017
8 of 14

Thanks for sharing all that. I can see why clients stay with you. Smiley Happy

 

I'm slowly learning how to bypass the jobs appearing unrealistic (expectations) and cheap (now I'm being cheeky). Thus far I'm passing on foreign (non US), industry or project that just doesn't fit, one already with a gazillion proposals (to use your hyperbolized measurement). Also being extra cautious if they have not verified payment yet.

 

Thanks again for your input. 

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
9 of 14

@Larry B wrote:

 

 

Different comments are interesting: one side noting the overwhelming competition as  "dime a dozen writers" and others saying they're having lots of success. Many postings of frustrated FL's who can't get any jobs.


 I'd lay pretty heavy odds that the former are mostly generalists and the latter are mostly specialists.

 

I have a lot of success as a writer on Upwork. I am a former attorney and write exclusively law firm website content, blog posts, e-books and legal technology/law practice management content.

 

Kat is a successful writer on Upwork. She's also a data scientist who has chosen niche focuses based on research.

 

Jennifer M. is a successful writer on Upwork. She's a programmer who writes IT content.

 

Michael whose first name may actually be Douglas is a successful writer on Upwork. To the best of my understanding, he focuses his work in the area of peer-reviewed medical content.

 

Noticing a trend?

 

 

brummondlarry
Active Member
Larry B Member Since: May 22, 2017
10 of 14

Great comments and much appreciated advice/suggestions. Thanks all for accelerating my learning curve. Following Tiffany's astute observations, I'd be wise to focus on small, even start-up software companies. Having worked in 4 different industires and written for a dozen (or more), i'm easily influenced by the writing task and tend to minimize the importance of the product or service. Onward and "Upwork".