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Who the *BLEEP* is Applying For These Jobs?!

Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
21 of 33

@Miroslav M wrote:

Wouldnt' you accept $3 gigs if you had a "secret weapon "enabling you to deliver 20 of such within an hour? The economy of scale. The fact that a Mars bar costs .35 or so doesn't prevent its makers from being multimillionaires. Yet I was wondering all this time how someone in the States can charge less than I can afford here (where the AMI is mere $10k annually or South/East Asia where it is $3k). Smiley Very Happy


 Nope. Given the choice between making $60 in an hour by churning out 20 pieces of crap and making roughly the same amount creating one good blog post, I'll take the latter every time.

Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
22 of 33

@Miroslav M wrote:

 

I wonder if some of those ultra cheapos perhaps use speech to text software to speed up  the whole process.


 I'm not sure whether it would be the same for everyone, but I have tried to use this (not for speed, but so that I can work on my more creative projects while walking) and it actually takes longer than just typing it in the first place, since it takes about as long to format and correct as it would to have just typed it directly, plus the dictation time.

Community Guru
Robert James R Member Since: Apr 17, 2015
23 of 33

@Miroslav M wrote:

 

How much time do y'all spend crafting a 500-word article or one page at your average rates?


It varies. Let's say the topic is right up my alley or something I've written about before so I know it like the back of my head.

 

500 words = 30 minutes average, 1 hour max if citations and images or graphs are needed.

 

1000 words = At least 2 hours in my case (eqv. to $75.00). It's like, no matter how easy the topic is, I experience difficulty completing the 1000 word limit in less than 2 hours. I usually finish in or just before the 3 hour mark.

 

In case of longer articles, what I normally do is write the outline first (or at least the headings necessary), then fill it out with information. I would then spend the rest of the time weaving the article together until it becomes coherent or fills out the word count needed by the client.

 

Depending on the topic or depth of research needed, I can spend no more than four hours or as much as six hours writing a 2000-word article.

Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
24 of 33

@Robert James R wrote:

@Miroslav M wrote:

 

How much time do y'all spend crafting a 500-word article or one page at your average rates?


It varies. Let's say the topic is right up my alley or something I've written about before so I know it like the back of my head.

 

500 words = 30 minutes average, 1 hour max if citations and images or graphs are needed.

 

1000 words = At least 2 hours in my case (eqv. to $75.00). It's like, no matter how easy the topic is, I experience difficulty completing the 1000 word limit in less than 2 hours. I usually finish in or just before the 3 hour mark.

 

In case of longer articles, what I normally do is write the outline first (or at least the headings necessary), then fill it out with information. I would then spend the rest of the time weaving the article together until it becomes coherent or fills out the word count needed by the client.

 

Depending on the topic or depth of research needed, I can spend no more than four hours or as much as six hours writing a 2000-word article.


 Have you ever tried breaking the topic into two pieces and writing two 500 word articles, then weaving them together? If that would work for you, it sounds like it would be a big time saver.

Community Guru
Cheryl K Member Since: Jul 16, 2015
25 of 33

Miroslav:

 

Seeing you use the term "y'all" just made my day! 

 

Bless your heart

 

We're rubbing off on you.

 

We'll have you eating fried chicken and black-eyed peas in 3 shakes of a sheep's tail.

 

 

Active Member
Margaret P Member Since: Apr 3, 2016
26 of 33

Those low rates really do raise my left eyebrow. As an Upworker of just over nine months, I found these jobs, and the fact that people were able to work for such low rates, quite upsetting, yep harrowing even. 

 

But then I filtered the jobs through the 'Expert' tab and there were fewer of them. 

 

Sometimes I go back to the unfiltered search just to see what's out there. Clients pricing is all over the shop and I've sometimes netted a really good rate from someone who called for an 'entry-level Upworker' yet were offering decent dosh, as we say.

 

So, skip over the jobs with price tags just don't suit your business model and focus your energies on ones that do. And lift your rate on your profile to show you're serious and can back that rate.

 

Upwork has some fantastic offerings. I really enjoy that I don't have to go out there with your shingle and convince businesses/organisations they need a copywriter, for example, what it means and what it can do for them. Upwork cuts to the chase and brings clients to the table that are ready to work with you, know what they want and have their finger poised over the 'start contract' button. 

 

regards

M

Active Member
Chris B Member Since: Dec 22, 2016
27 of 33

Margaret P wrote:

 

But then I filtered the jobs through the 'Expert' tab and there were fewer of them. 

 


I thought this was the solution to avoiding obscenely low rates, but the problem is that Upwork doesn't appear to require any standards around the expert levels. It's entirely up to the client what they consider to be "higher rates."

 

Here's a job posting I read today: **Edited for Community Guidelines** It's marked Expert Level ($$$), and the pay is $6. LOL

 

Upwork could solve the issue here with rates by requiring reasonable standards for each of the three expert levels. They don't appear motivated to do so.

Ace Contributor
Brandy H Member Since: Dec 8, 2016
28 of 33

"Who the *BLEEP* is Applying For These Jobs?!"

 

This "bottom-feeder" here, for one. I'm applying for these jobs, **Edited for Community Guidelines**

Community Leader
Richard L Member Since: Dec 14, 2016
29 of 33
I was so angry at fees being offered one day that I spent 2 contact points to reprimand someone offering a job. It was a mistake because the person offering the job complained about my effort to alert them to their unethical practices, and *I* was issued a warning.

Lowball offers are not good for anyone. On the other hand, some rates I have seen here are absurdly high. Upwork has a long way to go to fix the system -- there are so many small ways to make it more friendly.

The solution to the rate issue is hardly clearcut, but better definition of what rates are supposed to apply to (e.g. for editing, is it $ per page, per word, per hour, per project, other). I find I skip over jobs that are unverified that post rates like $5 fixed price because I dont want to spend the credits and find out it was per job.
Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
30 of 33

@Richard L wrote:
I was so angry at fees being offered one day that I spent 2 contact points to reprimand someone offering a job. It was a mistake because the person offering the job complained about my effort to alert them to their unethical practices, and *I* was issued a warning.

Lowball offers are not good for anyone. On the other hand, some rates I have seen here are absurdly high. Upwork has a long way to go to fix the system -- there are so many small ways to make it more friendly.

The solution to the rate issue is hardly clearcut, but better definition of what rates are supposed to apply to (e.g. for editing, is it $ per page, per word, per hour, per project, other). I find I skip over jobs that are unverified that post rates like $5 fixed price because I dont want to spend the credits and find out it was per job.

 Lol! 

 

Unfortunately, just because because a client wants work for the lowest rates doesn't make him or her unethical. Upwork's ethics are laid out in its terms of service and use. When we sign up we agree to those terms, however much it might go against the grain.  So it is better to gripe in the forums than call a client out on his/her miserable requirements. 

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