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Writing time

laneski-maureen
Active Member
Maureen L Member Since: Jun 21, 2017
1 of 29

It takes me entirely too long to write articles and posts, especially if they need research. How long SHOULD it take? Or, how long does it take for you? I've only been at this a few months. 

 

Does it get better?

 

 

miroslav84
Community Guru
Miroslav M Member Since: Jan 21, 2016
2 of 29

I am not a native English speaker. In my case, it takes 2 to 5 hours of work to complete a 1,000 words piece. If the client says the work is to be given to a native editor, it will take me a bit less time as I can fully concentrate on the subject matter and have only one proofread before completion, otherwise I shall read it two or three times more to make sure the style and tone is up to my expectations and capabilities..

 

In my mother tongue, it takes 1.5 to 2.5 hours depending on how familiar I am with the subject.

wendy_writes
Community Guru
Wendy C Member Since: Aug 24, 2015
3 of 29

One writer's perspective: 

As a writer, do NOT take hourly jobs. 

    - thinking time does not contain key strokes

    - research time does not contain enough key strokes to CYA

Writers need to factor these elements into the equation and then bid a fixed price that includes both plus writing skills.

As an editor - hourly jobs are fine.

As a translator - hourly jobs are fine.

 

There is also the aspect of 'note taking' or whatever the system calls it - and this is extraordinarily disruptive to the actual writing process.

miroslav84
Community Guru
Miroslav M Member Since: Jan 21, 2016
4 of 29

Agree that hourly jobs for writing are a big no-no. The only exception to that is "article spinning" which is closer to typing/data entry than to actual writing. What I want you to ask is whether charging per word is also a wrong approach in your opinion? Per word billing is often associated with deviations such as writing filler content, using frequent word-consuming phrases in place of simple expressions and adding less relevant information to the piece. 

 

I think piece-based and project-based billing is the best solution for writing jobs, though the issue of hours spent writing is also important for planning and keeping track of our productivity.

petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
5 of 29

@Wendy C wrote:

One writer's perspective: 

1) As a writer, do NOT take hourly jobs. 

2)    - thinking time does not contain key strokes

3)    - research time does not contain enough key strokes to CYA

 

4) There is also the aspect of 'note taking' or whatever the system calls it - and this is extraordinarily disruptive to the actual writing process.


Wendy, with all due respect... You don't do hourly contracts so you are not familiar with the process, or at least not from your own experience.

 

1) Personal choice. Yours is not to work on an hourly basis.

2) True

3) Most people do most of their research online which usually involves keystrokes or mouseclicks.

4) How is it "extraordinarily disruptive" to enter a short work memo when you first start the tracker? Seriously? It takes seconds, once per whatever it is you're doing.

datasciencewonk
Community Guru
Kat C Member Since: Jul 11, 2016
6 of 29

@Petra R wrote:

@Wendy C wrote:

One writer's perspective: 

1) As a writer, do NOT take hourly jobs. 

2)    - thinking time does not contain key strokes

3)    - research time does not contain enough key strokes to CYA

 

4) There is also the aspect of 'note taking' or whatever the system calls it - and this is extraordinarily disruptive to the actual writing process.


Wendy, with all due respect... You don't do hourly contracts so you are not familiar with the process, or at least not from your own experience.

 

1) Personal choice. Yours is not to work on an hourly basis.

2) True

3) Most people do most of their research online which usually involves keystrokes or mouseclicks.

4) How is it "extraordinarily disruptive" to enter a short work memo when you first start the tracker? Seriously? It takes seconds, once per whatever it is you're doing.


 100% Agree.

 

And a majority of my writing contracts are hourly.

 

 

 

tlbp
Community Guru
Tonya P Member Since: Nov 26, 2015
7 of 29

@Wendy C wrote:

One writer's perspective: 

As a writer, do NOT take hourly jobs. 

    - thinking time does not contain key strokes

    - research time does not contain enough key strokes to CYA

Writers need to factor these elements into the equation and then bid a fixed price that includes both plus writing skills.

As an editor - hourly jobs are fine.

As a translator - hourly jobs are fine.

 

There is also the aspect of 'note taking' or whatever the system calls it - and this is extraordinarily disruptive to the actual writing process.


 Agree. Unless it is a short and sweet blog entry, the process just isn't suited for hourly tracking in this writer's opinion

reinierb
Community Guru
Reinier B Member Since: Nov 3, 2015
8 of 29

@Maureen L wrote:

It takes me entirely too long to write articles and posts, especially if they need research. How long SHOULD it take? Or, how long does it take for you? I've only been at this a few months. 

 

Does it get better?

 

 


 It does get better, but only after you decide to stick to the topics you know best. Ideally, you should stick to topics you can write on off the top of your head, or that require only minimal research, but still within your field of expertise.

 

Taking on writing jobs about things you know nothing or very little about is a sure-fire way to crash and burn.

stevekoek
Active Member
Steve K Member Since: Sep 12, 2019
9 of 29

Reinier, this might be the best advice I've seen on this board. I wish I had seen this a couple of months ago. It cost me time and money to figure it out on my own. I had to learn that I didn't HAVE to accept every job, 

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
10 of 29

Maureen, don't try to find a standard. Every writer is different and every job is different. You mentioned 2,000 word articles in another post. I've written many 2,000 word articles in 75-90 minutes each. I've taken as long as 12 hours to write a 2,000 word article. I don't do hourly jobs, but when I'm pricing a fixed-price writing project I think about how long the research is likely to take, how in-depth the content is going to be, how long I anticipate it will take to write, how much my existing expertise factors in (the client doesn't get a discount because the piece will take me half the time it would take someone else if the reason it will go so quickly is that I'm already an expert in the subject matter--expertise costs more), how tight the deadline is, and the value of the piece to the client's business.

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