Reply
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply

A client ended my fixed price contract after submitting the work

ziko87
Active Member
Zakaria C Member Since: Feb 16, 2016
1 of 20

Hello everyone,


A client and I agreed some terms and started a fixed-price contract with one milestone of 200$. It's about building a desktop application that performs some actions described in the specifications document. Before accepting the project, the client interviewed me for more than two hours, he kept asking me million questions, each time I say he seems difficult to work with but when I looked at his history he has 10 of 5-starts reviews, so I decided to take the project. My 200$ estimation was based on 8 hours work of my hourly rate 25$/hour. The actual work took me around 12 hours, and I build an app 100% congruent with the specifications. I submitted the work, and the client told me that the app didn't work for him. I started investigating in his environment to make sure there's not something that prevents the app from working. Later, he asked me to test it in my computer and send him the output and so I did. I sent him a 100% valid output and he started asking me for different things (wanted to change the requirements), I told him no problem, I can perform the adjustment you want as soon we get the app working in your computer. Few hours later, he ended the contract and asked for full refund. From his behavior, I felt that maybe he did this to take the app for free (I spent a total time of 20h, between building, discussing, and fixing his problems).

In this situation and based on your experience, what would you recommend me to do ?


1- Refuse his request and file a dispute (I did this once, I was the wining of the dispute but it affected negatively my JSS, so I'm afraid of doing it again)


2-Sacrifice my 20h work and give him full refund (Hoping this won't affect my JSS)


3-Other solutions if any.


Thank you in advance.


Best Regards,

Zak,

versailles
Community Guru
Rene K Member Since: Jul 10, 2014
2 of 20

@Zakaria C wrote:


2-Sacrifice my 20h work and give him full refund (Hoping this won't affect my JSS)



It will, he will leave a bad private feedback which will impact your JSS. Keep the money, you already worked a lot more than expected.

 

Next time:

- hourly job to avoid scope creep

- avoid cheap clients

- when you feel that at the interview stage the client is already PITA or trying to milk you, kiss them a goodbye

-----------
"Where darkness shines like dazzling light"   —William Ashbless
ziko87
Active Member
Zakaria C Member Since: Feb 16, 2016
3 of 20

Thank you Rene for your reply.


Unfortunately the 10 good reviews he has I got a wrong image about his reality. Yes, I made a mistake when I accepted working with him 😞

brianajross
Community Leader
Briana R Member Since: Jul 8, 2015
4 of 20

@Rene K wrote:

@Zakaria C wrote:


2-Sacrifice my 20h work and give him full refund (Hoping this won't affect my JSS)



It will, he will leave a bad private feedback which will impact your JSS. Keep the money, you already worked a lot more than expected.

 

Next time:

- hourly job to avoid scope creep

- avoid cheap clients

- when you feel that at the interview stage the client is already PITA or trying to milk you, kiss them a goodbye


This doesn't sound like scope creap. Revisions and adjustments to provide a working product are a given. You can't deliver a broker product and then call it scope creap when your asked to fix it.

 

That said, a flat rate is a flat rate and it doesn't matter how many hours it took. Consider this a lesson learned and next time you charge a flat rate, take into consideration allowences for client revisions and issues that could come up. If you come out ahead, great. Over time you'll find that you come ahead on some projects and fall behind on others, but hopefully you should average your desired hourly rate. If not, take a look at what you're charging for flat rate projects.

ziko87
Active Member
Zakaria C Member Since: Feb 16, 2016
5 of 20

Thank you Briana,

 

This is not just about choosing the right rate, but it's a whole work that won't be paid !

mthornton-cpc
Community Guru
Melissa T Member Since: Dec 5, 2014
6 of 20

Briana, if Zak can produce a report showing full functionality on multiple configs, then it's not a broken product. I've been in a similar situation before and in that case it was user error on the client's part that was the root of the problem. Can't say for sure if that's what has happened here, but it's certainly a possibilty. 

ziko87
Active Member
Zakaria C Member Since: Feb 16, 2016
7 of 20

Melissa,

 

Here there's no proof of broken product. The client just complained and I stared checking and then he ended the contract !

mthornton-cpc
Community Guru
Melissa T Member Since: Dec 5, 2014
8 of 20

Zak, I understand. Since you checked your work and know it's not broken it seems this client wanted free work. 

mtngigi
Community Guru
Virginia F Member Since: Feb 15, 2016
9 of 20

I don't know a thing about building apps, but if you gave him a working app ... he should pay for it.

 

And wouldn't it belong to you if he doesn't pay for it? Meaning he can't use it?

ziko87
Active Member
Zakaria C Member Since: Feb 16, 2016
10 of 20

Hi Virginia,

 

I gave him the app and it's working and he can use it. I think he did this just to take it for free !

TOP SOLUTION AUTHORS
TOP KUDOED MEMBERS