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Re: Am I digging too much from Clients?

Ace Contributor
Nassoro C Member Since: Nov 11, 2014
1 of 14

First, I never pay attention to jobs posted by "Clients" whose payment method is not verified and in fact, I do filter to dump them out my way! Yes, they might be honest Clients but I can't take the chance to risk my 2 Connects valued at $2.

 

There're these Clients as well, payment method verified but ever hired! Sometimes, if it's an hourly job, I can take the chance to bid but if the job offers fixed pay rate, no way I can take the chance to risk my $2.

 

But there's this also! Before posting my bid, I first review "About Client's" section to see his/her hiring trend and how much s/he's spent! I think majority do the same. However, I usually go beyond this far. I'll usually go down the job post to see his/her avarage pay s/her has offered before for similar job. If his/her avarage pay is far below my minimum bid I can post, I never risk my $2.

 

But apart from all that there's something which I also look and this's what has forced me to write this thread and ask if I am too insecure! I usually look at his/her reputation in terms of "Stars" offered! If it's too low, say 3 stars, I'll always go down the job post to see the source(s) of these 3 stars! Sometimes, you may find the Client was evaluated by, say, 10 Freelancers and out of these 10 Freelancers, Only ONE or may be TWO gave him/her bad repuatation to the point s/he felt into 3 Stars in aggregate. For this case, I can consider may be my two fellow freelancers have problems otherwise I don't see any explanation where all 8 Freelancers find the Client is very good but only one or two find him/her as a worst client! That's why am saying I don't care poor reputation of the Client if such reputation resulted from one or two angry freelancers for whatever reason!

 

However, today I came to one job post! As usual, after reviewing "About Client's" section, our dear Client don't have good reputation! And when I scrolled down the job post to see rating trends, OMG! It's like "An eye for an eye" game between Client and Freelancers who'd ever worked with this Client before! You see this Freelancer giving 2 Stars to Client and Client gives 1 Star to that Freelancer! You again see this Freelancer giving 3 Stars to the Client and Client in turn gives 2 Stars to that Freelancer! Very few among all had good terms between them! Then I questioned myself, are all these Freelancers bad performers or are less professional or our dear Client has a problem?!

 

Not only I didn't like to risk my $2 but also I didn't like to risk my reputation either because I know I am not the very best than all to expect good reputation from such Client because, when I calculate probablity of occurence, the chance is below 20% to get 4 Stars not mentiong 5 Stars  which, none of the Freelancer had ever gotten from this Client!!!!

Community Guru
Joachim M Member Since: Mar 23, 2015
2 of 14

What exactly is your question?

 

BTW, why are opposed to fixed price jobs? I don't do hourly jobs at all.

Community Leader
Sharon L Member Since: Jun 14, 2015
3 of 14

I was under the impression that hourly jobs paid more than fixed price jobs. This fits with my (limited) experience. Personally, I don't mind whatever job I get, so long as if it is a fixed price job, it is above $50.

Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
4 of 14
Hourly jobs don't necessarily pay more than fixed-price jobs. It depends on how you structure a job.

Many contractors earn more money using hourly contracts. Others earn more using fixed-price contracts.

If you offer a service for $100 and it only takes you 30 minutes to do it, then you earned $200 per hour on your fixed-price contract.

If you asked the same client to pay you $200 per hour for that work, she thinks it's too much. She'll only pay $50 per hour. So you make more money using a fixed price contract in this scenario. The client loved what you did in thirty minutes and thought she got a great deal.

Another client offered to pay $100 for the same service, but she pestered you with all kinds of ridiculous requests for changes and insisted on a number of Skype discussions and you ended up spending four hours on her project. So you earned $25 per hour.

Same service, different earnings for you per hour. If you had charged the second client $50 per hour, you would have earned $200 for your four hours of work.

Some clients do not understand or respect the fixed-price contract model and you should never allow them to use it with you.

Neither model earns you more invariably. It depends on how you work and how you manage clients and the type of work you do.
Ace Contributor
Nassoro C Member Since: Nov 11, 2014
5 of 14

@Preston H wrote:
Hourly jobs don't necessarily pay more than fixed-price jobs. It depends on how you structure a job.

Many contractors earn more money using hourly contracts. Others earn more using fixed-price contracts.

Hello Preston,
Thank you for your contribution. I think members didn't get my point. I don't have problem with fixed prices and I don't consider you earns more with hourly rate than fixed prices, this's not my point though I am also very careful when bidding to fixed prices jobs because I still remember when I worked for more than 50 hours for only $15 less oDesk charge. This's very common for fixed price jobs you don't careful examine the expected workload.
Going back to the topic, my point was about fixed price jobs offered by Clients with no hiring history. This's what I wrote: "There're these Clients as well, payment method verified but (sic) ever hired! Sometimes, if it's an hourly job, I can take the chance to bid but if the job offers fixed pay rate, no way I can take the chance to risk my $2."
I used "sic" in quoatation because the correct sentence is  "There're these Clients as well, payment method verified but never hired!
So, my point is, I don't take the chance to apply to fixed prices jobs if the Client has Zero hire rate even if his/her payment method is verified. This client has no hiring history and so, payment history as well. So long as fixed prices jobs are hard to control the payment, and even oDesk says they can't guarantee your payment, then I take no chance to spend my 2 Connects worth $2 to Client with no hiring history. Some Clients will offer fixed price paid twice a month which means, you'll have to work for two weeks without being sure if you'll be paid or not beause you're working with a Client who has no history; the same way when majority of Clients use number of hours worked by Freelancer as one of the requirements, which, not only it help them to control the flow of applications but also they don't want to take the risk to work with Freelancers with no history. 
Nassoro.

 

Ace Contributor
Nassoro C Member Since: Nov 11, 2014
6 of 14

@Sharon L wrote:

I was under the impression that hourly jobs paid more than fixed price jobs. This fits with my (limited) experience. Personally, I don't mind whatever job I get, so long as if it is a fixed price job, it is above $50.


 Hello Sharon, thanks to your contribution. However, my point isn't hourly jobs pay more than fixed price jobs, that's not my point. My point is, I don't take the chance to risk my $2 to apply to fixed price jobs from Clients with no hiring history. Here's what I wrote: "There're these Clients as well, payment method verified but (sic) ever hired! Sometimes, if it's an hourly job, I can take the chance to bid but if the job offers fixed pay rate, no way I can take the chance to risk my $2."

 

 I used "sic" in above quotation because I meant to say: "There're these Clients as well, payment method verified but never hired! "

 

So,  I don't take the chance because this client has no hiring history and so, payment history as well. So long as fixed prices jobs are hard to control the payment, and even oDesk says they can't guarantee your payment, then I take no chance to spend my 2 Connects worth $2 to Client with no hiring history. Some Clients will offer fixed price paid twice a month which means, you'll have to work for two weeks without being sure if you'll be paid or not because you're working with a Client who has no history; the same way when majority of Clients use number of hours worked by Freelancer as one of the requirements, which, not only it help them to control the flow of applications but also they don't want to take the risk to work with Freelancers with no history. 

 

Nassoro.

 

Ace Contributor
Nassoro C Member Since: Nov 11, 2014
7 of 14

@Joachim M wrote:

What exactly is your question?

 

BTW, why are opposed to fixed price jobs? I don't do hourly jobs at all.


You didn't get my point! I didn't say I oppose fixed jobs; here's what I said: "There're these Clients as well, payment method verified but (sic) ever hired! Sometimes, if it's an hourly job, I can take the chance to bid but if the job offers fixed pay rate, no way I can take the chance to risk my $2." I hope you know the meaning of (sic) in the quotation above. The correct sentence is  "There're these Clients as well, payment method verified but never hired! So, my point is, I don't take the chance to apply to fixed prices jobs if the Client has Zero hire rate even if his/her payment method is verified. This client has no hiring history and so, payment history as well. So long as fixed prices jobs are hard to control the payment, and even oDesk says they can't guarantee your payment, then I take no chance to spend my 2 Connects worth $2 to Client with no hiring history. Some Clients will offer fixed price paid twice a month which means, you'll have to work for two weeks without being sure if you'll be paid or not beause you're working with a Client who has no history; the same way when majority of Clients use number of hours worked by Freelancer as one of the requirements, which, not only it help them to control the flow of applications but also they don't want to take the risk to work with Freelancers with no history. 

 

What exactly my question? The title says a lot, "am I digging too much from Clients?" Anyway, I might not be understood because English is not my first language and I rarely use it in my daily life! But after asking whether I am digging too much from Clients, or probably mining too much or may be scrutinizing too much, or whatever the correct word may be, then I started to describe things I am looking before posting my application and at the end of thread, I also talked of rating history of the client... the way s/he rates and get rated. Here I talked with those Clients, may be from 20 Freelancers who'd ever worked with him/her,  15 rated him/her as not good to work with and 17 of them got negative rating from that Client! Under this situation, I can't take the chance to ignore what's been said by 75% of Freelancers and believe all 17 Freelancers out of 20 were bad performers! So, there is where my question originated, whether I am mining a lot! 

Moderator
Valeria K Moderator Member Since: Mar 6, 2014
8 of 14

Hi Nassoro,


I don't think there is anything wrong in the way you check your potential client's work history. A lot of freelancers know that you can often learn more about the client from feedback the client gave to freelancers than from feedback freelancers gave to the client.

~ Valeria
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Ace Contributor
Nassoro C Member Since: Nov 11, 2014
9 of 14

@Valeria K wrote:

Hi Nassoro,


I don't think there is anything wrong in the way you check your potential client's work history. A lot of freelancers know that you can often learn more about the client from feedback the client gave to freelancers than from feedback freelancers gave to the client.


You know what Valeria? I know my English isn't that good because, not only it's not my first language but also I rarely use it in my country since everywhere we use Kiswahili! However, after reading other comments, I started to doubt myself because though I know my English isn't that good but I didn't know if it's that bad either! All of them didn't get my point except you! Thanks. 

Community Guru
Aleksandra K Member Since: Mar 31, 2015
10 of 14

Nassoro,

 

I do this too, so I don’t think what you are doing is weird. I usually even check their first review just to see if somebody was not happy with the client.

 

 

I think that your post can be misunderstood when read quickly, as it is a bit longer.

 

 

 In my point of view for a non-native speaker who doesn’t use English very often, your English is pretty good Smiley Very Happy

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