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How do I politely get out of a long-term contract without damaging my JSS?

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Active Member
Amanda Marie C Member Since: Feb 18, 2018
1 of 6

Hi all! I am wondering how to get out of a long-term contract without damaging my JSS? This client is super sweet, and I love the topics, but the amount of research for the pay just isn't worth it anymore. I write an article every few weeks. I have been wanting to bail, but I want to do it in a tactful way without offending a super nice client. I know that this project is no longer an appropriate use of my time, and luckily, we have been doing contracts every couple of articles. Do I ask to close this contract and then say that I am done? Or do I tell the client before closing the contract? I have a solid JSS and would like to keep it that way, but I also need to get out so I can take on projects that are higher paying and take less time. Plus, these articles are stressing me out. Any advice would be appreciated, thanks! 

Ace Contributor
David M Member Since: Aug 16, 2016
2 of 6

"Hey [Client], thanks for all the work you sent my way, but unfortunately I've found a long-term opportunity and I will no longer be able to help you. Please don't forget to leave feedback when you can."

 

-Your Name

 

Seriously, this is not that difficult.

Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
3 of 6

@David M wrote:

"Hey [Client], thanks for all the work you sent my way, but unfortunately I've found a long-term opportunity and I will no longer be able to help you. Please don't forget to leave feedback when you can."

 

Seriously, this is not that difficult.


 Well, the above is clumsy and an almost surefire way to destroy one's JSS.

Ace Contributor
David M Member Since: Aug 16, 2016
4 of 6

My JSS is just fine, Petra. Thank you for your concern, though.

Community Guru
Phyllis G Member Since: Sep 8, 2016
BEST ANSWER
5 of 6

First, if it's really a matter of money, then give the client a chance to make it worth your while. "I enjoy the work I do for you, but over time my practice has grown, I've raised my rate/fee, and my calendar is staying fully booked. If we are to continue, I will need to charge x amount. I understand that may not align with your budget, and if you need to find someone else to take over, I can be available to continue accepting assignments through such-and-such a date." [or one more article, or whatever makes sense for the pace/rhythm of the contract]

 

Never risk burning a bridge when you can avoid it. If you genuinely like and respect the client, then do what you can to make your departure as non-disruptive as possible. You never know when a small-project client might be in a position to send a big-bucks client your way.

 

And no, don't mention feedback!

 

ETA: This is a good example of how, in most instances (IMO), if we focus on finding a win/win solution, then the JSS will take care of itself.

Community Leader
Abderrazzak B Member Since: Mar 23, 2017
6 of 6

@Phyllis G wrote:

First, if it's really a matter of money, then give the client a chance to make it worth your while. "I enjoy the work I do for you, but over time my practice has grown, I've raised my rate/fee, and my calendar is staying fully booked. If we are to continue, I will need to charge x amount. I understand that may not align with your budget, and if you need to find someone else to take over, I can be available to continue accepting assignments through such-and-such a date." [or one more article, or whatever makes sense for the pace/rhythm of the contract]

 

Never risk burning a bridge when you can avoid it. If you genuinely like and respect the client, then do what you can to make your departure as non-disruptive as possible. You never know when a small-project client might be in a position to send a big-bucks client your way.

 

And no, don't mention feedback!


 Totally agree

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