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Bidding on Fixed Price Jobs

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Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
11 of 22

@Rene K wrote:

 

English Spelling Test (U.S. Version)5.001st Place!

 

Lol :-)


 lol

 

eta: More lulz at the 2 minute tests. hahahahaha 

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Community Guru
David G Member Since: Oct 6, 2011
12 of 22

@Rene K wrote:

@Mohammed Ismail H wrote:

what i will bid if the budget is 200-250???? pls reply.


 

English Spelling Test (U.S. Version)5.001st Place!

 

Lol :-)


 Not to defend the poster but there is a difference between being able to spell words correctly and being able to use those words properly.

 

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Community Guru
Jennifer M Member Since: May 17, 2015
13 of 22

@Mohammed Ismail H wrote:

what i will bid if the budget is 200-250???? pls reply.


$20000 

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Community Guru
Kathy T Member Since: Jul 17, 2015
14 of 22

You bid what you think you are worth and the amount of time it will take. I look at a client's budget but I Never go by their budget. Sometimes I bid lower because of tips and tricks I know plus my skills that will come into play to make this job easy and quick, sometimes I bid higher because the job is more conplex then the client thinks it is. and sometimes, my bid is spot on with the budget.

 

And I have to comment Mohammed - Microsoft Word test - 3 minutes ????

And Microsoft Excel test --- 2 minutes.

 

That's pretty impressive figuring that it would take ME 2 minutes just to read the first 10 questions of the 40 question test. And I'm not talking about answering the questions, I'm just talking about reading the questions.  That comes out to something like 5 seconds pr questions. I didn't know anyone who could read that fast never mind choosing the correct answers.

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Community Guru
David G Member Since: Oct 6, 2011
15 of 22

I have my rate and that's what I charge. I have a specific rate I charge for editing a certain number of words.

 

Even if the client has a budget that is higher than this, I still usually apply with my rate. Unfortunately, I rarely see a client who has a budget that is a lot higher than the rate I charge.

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Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
16 of 22

Douglas wrote, 'I'd be interested to hear whether anyone else here has scored contracts with bids over budget.'

 

I think bidding over budget is a viable strategy, but only if you're not minding your connects, because I doubt every client is willing to consider bids over budget, so the possible downside is wasting a connect.

__________________________________________________
"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
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Community Guru
Stephen B Member Since: Dec 4, 2012
17 of 22

"I'd be interested to hear whether anyone else here has scored contracts with bids over budget"

Yes, quite regularly - because a lot of clients don't really know the real market values - sell yourself and explain why you charge what you do. I've quite a few times landed over-budget jobs ahead of 15+ applicants.

 

...and then as David says, I  quite often bid under budget if a quite rich client posts a silly budget. These ones get swarmed on like wasps to a jamjar, with the most ridiculous applicants - because they just see a rich, silly client; but when I do bid low, I make a point of explaining why, and that i'm not undercutting, but just charging an honest, sensible fee. And agin, it work often enough. I've quite a few times landed under-budget jobs ahead of 15+ applicants.

 

So wht do the two examples have in common? Quite simply, bid sensibly and assertively according to your own worth, and explain why you're bidding like you are..

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Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
18 of 22

Stephen's post is excellent, and others have echoed his sentiments about sending a fixed-rate bid that reflects your rates given the specified project.

 

There are two different types of projects that we're talking about here, one which is a "set" project, such as writing a certain amount of words or editing or translating a certain document, and the other is a "flexible" project, for which a bid can be customized to fit a budget.

 

The projects I work on are the latter.

 

If a client needs a database design and posts a budget of $200, for example, I can customize a bid to fit the budget. I will break down various components of the project to fit his job description, and itemize the different parts, and specify what he would be getting for $200. I may indicate other aspects of the job that are commonly associated with what he specified, and explain that we can discuss those separately, but that those wouldn't be included in the $200 bid.

 

Clients commonly have little knowledge of the different options and tasks associated with the types of projects they ask my help with. So I typically provide details so they know exactly what they would be buying, as well as what the quote would not include.

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Community Guru
Abdul R Member Since: Dec 4, 2014
19 of 22

If you do bidding lower then can you grow your career. I think, certainly not. Yeah, You can bid over budget. In one of my project, I submitted my bid with $ 150 over the client budget. Client accepted my bid and I did a project. Understand that your work has a value.  

 

Clients who do not understand the value of the work. They go behind low bids. Clients that have more knowledge and understand the worth of the work, they pay according to freelancer budget. 

 

You can view my profile and your feedback will precious for me. 

 

Thank you, 

 

Abdulrazaq

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Ace Contributor
Jaime L Member Since: May 11, 2015
20 of 22

Thanks everyone for the advice! This is turning into a better discussion than I expected. Smiley Happy

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