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Connects are too expensive

vasilijzgr
Active Member
Vasil Z Member Since: Dec 23, 2017
21 of 28

1. Because 2000$ are always better than 1000$ or 1000$ are better than 500$

2. A new freelancer can't get a start on Upwork not because  the gigs are few but because he has a few  possibilities to bid on a serious project(as I said, some are not awarded, and for the rest, you can't bid because you haven't enough connects)

3. "It would seem to me the focus should be on acquiring new clients for existing freelancers." what do you mean by existing freelancer? The new freelancer is also an existing freelancer that one day can bring a lot of profit to Upwork

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
22 of 28

@Vasil Z wrote:

1. Because 2000$ are always better than 1000$ or 1000$ are better than 500$

 

Perhaps. It depends on what you have to do to get it.

2. A new freelancer can't get a start on Upwork not because  the gigs are few but because he has a few  possibilities to bid on a serious project(as I said, some are not awarded, and for the rest, you can't bid because you haven't enough connects)

 

What does that mean? New freelancers have exactly the same opportunity to bid on serious projects as experienced freelancers.


3. "It would seem to me the focus should be on acquiring new clients for existing freelancers." what do you mean by existing freelancer? The new freelancer is also an existing freelancer that one day can bring a lot of profit to Upwork

 

Nope. There are more freelancers than there are jobs by a factor of at least ten (and much more in some areas). Adding freelancers, unless they bring specialized skills that aren't readily available in the current Upwork marketplace, doesn't increase Upwork's profits one dime. It just spreads around the number of freelancers their revenues come from, making more work for customer service. Added revenues come from added jobs.


 

alokeshwar
Ace Contributor
Aloke T Member Since: May 5, 2015
23 of 28
No matter how much justification is put behind the connects pricing, fact is that this another way of making more money for upwork while ignoring freelancers. I spent over a 100 connects in two months and no success. I chose jobs carefully, apply with notes personalized for the job yet no success. I see jobs that require 6 connects and have 20 - 50 bids. The jobs remain open for weeks and even get closed and freelancers lost conneft for no reason. Clients do not lose money, no freelancers get any jobs but upwork still makes between $18 - $45 on such jobs. This is the whole reason for connects pricing.
vasilijzgr
Active Member
Vasil Z Member Since: Dec 23, 2017
24 of 28
Exactly. That's why I am not using Upwork at all anymore.
sivavranagaro
Community Guru
Vesna M Member Since: May 15, 2012
25 of 28

@Vasil Z wrote:
But on the other hand you must also filter the quality of projects posted to the platforms. I have bided last month to 30 projects, one per day in a carefully selected project, but at the end 70% of these projects are not serious projects, till now without an awarded freelancer and no one is interviewed.

I think Upwork must really rethink their platform.

Correct. Last time I took notes and counted all awarded vs non awarded projects there was about 50:50 ratio. 

Just, I can't see any smart way to screen serious from unserious clients until it's too late (month passes, no freelancer hired).

____________
Don't correct my grammar!
r2streu
Community Guru
Randall S Member Since: Mar 20, 2017
26 of 28

My understanding is, if a client closes the job without hiring a freelancer, you get those credits back. The problem is, the clients aren't always as diligent as they should be about closing out those jobs. 

 

What would be HELPFUL is if Upwork would establish a time limit of some kind, like if there's no activity within a month on an open job, they'll close it out and return all connects. That sort of thing. 

 

As for buying connects, I do. I haven't used as many in the last month, but I've been around long enough to know that leaner months are coming, in which I'll be very happy to have all those roll-over connects. 

 

I have a premium account for a couple reasons:
1. The ability to buy more connects when I need them. Frankly, there are months in which I DO need more than my allotted 30 - 35 bids per month.

2. The ability to see what others are bidding. This isn't important in every sector, but in VO it really is. Because Upwork typically pays so much lower than standard market rate, it helps to be able to get a rough estimate of where others in my field are bidding. If the client is offering $20 for a job, but the average bid is closer to $100 because freelancers are pushing market rates, I know I'm safe with a higher bid. I still MIGHT not get the job, but I have a much better chance than if I'm the only high bidder in a sea of lowballs. As you might expect, this benefit also SAVES me in connects, because if everyone is low-balling, I know not to waste my time and money. 

tlsanders
Community Guru
Tiffany S Member Since: Jan 15, 2016
27 of 28

@Randy S wrote:

 

What would be HELPFUL is if Upwork would establish a time limit of some kind, like if there's no activity within a month on an open job, they'll close it out and return all connects. That sort of thing. 

 

I'm not sure what others' experiences are, but a policy like this would have cost me at least $10,000 in Upwork earnings, as two or three of my long-term clients have come back and hired me 6 seeks to more than three months after I bid.

 

 

2. The ability to see what others are bidding. This isn't important in every sector, but in VO it really is. Because Upwork typically pays so much lower than standard market rate, it helps to be able to get a rough estimate of where others in my field are bidding. If the client is offering $20 for a job, but the average bid is closer to $100 because freelancers are pushing market rates, I know I'm safe with a higher bid. I still MIGHT not get the job, but I have a much better chance than if I'm the only high bidder in a sea of lowballs. As you might expect, this benefit also SAVES me in connects, because if everyone is low-balling, I know not to waste my time and money. 

 

I don't understand "Upwork typically pays...." You're talking about thousands of individual clients. Sure, there may be more low-price jobs posted here than high-price ones (that's pretty much true everywhere that freelance gigs are posted, unless it's a high-end, niche platform where freelancers are thoroughly vetted). But, clients make individual decisions. 

 

More importantly, re the last point, Upwork is also filled with lowball writers. Yet, I (and several others I know) routinely bid quite a bit over the posted budget. My clients often tell me that my bid was the highest they received. The fact that a client has received a bunch of garbage bids from poorly qualified freelancers doesn't mean he or she isn't in the market for actual skills.


 

r2streu
Community Guru
Randall S Member Since: Mar 20, 2017
28 of 28

By "Upwork typically pays..." I was referring to clients. Just in shorthand. And I'm POSITIVE this is true among pretty much any site like this one.  

 

I spoke regarding the VO sector because, as I said, I simply don't have experience to speak to other types of jobs here. I'm sure there ARE lowballers in every industry. My experience here is simply that MOST of the jobs posted in my industry are far lower than what has typically been industry standard. It's not a complaint -- just a recognition of reality. By seeing what other people are bidding, I can make the decision about whether it's worth the time and connects to place a bid on the job. I'm very often higher than most other bidders -- and I do very often win those... but it's still worthwhile, to me anyway, to see what the competition is doing. 
For certain jobs, it's often clear that the client may well be willing to pay more for quality. For others, particularly small jobs, often in-house with little need for decent quality, the clients will often simply go with the lowest semi-competent bidder. Seeing the bids in relationship to the job posting (and any other information I can dig up beforehand, like how much the client has spent, how many jobs they've hired for, etc) helps inform my decision on whether to bid or not. 

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