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Not Getting Hours Described in Job Post

r2krw9
Active Member

I got hired for a job that said 30+ hours a week for more than 6 months. The employer hired one other person but I've only been given 5 hours a week. I'm a little confused. Does the other person have 25 hours? I haven't been given any work this week and they aren't responding to my messages. Not sure what to do. Smiley Frustrated

7 REPLIES 7
lysis10
Community Guru

Let me guess. He told you he has 30+ hours for you and could you lower your rate. Yeah, I fell for that and not no mo'.

I never believe them when they say that.  I have 3 jobs that said "30 hours per week" and none have them have been near that much.  You need to find more jobs to plug in.  I find that clients always over-estimate their needs.

Well, its depends on the nature of the job, is job continuous in nature ( daily repetitive tasks) or just need one or two hours in a day.

 

I have few jobs where i am working on 40 hours a week from past few weeks, but it depends on nature of work.

prestonhunter
Community Guru

If you're getting 5 hours of work per week from this client and you would like to work more, then the best thing you could do would be:

 

a) send a single message, which does NOT refer to the original job posting, pointing out that you are available to do more work if the client would like you to.

 

b) apply for more work with other clients.

 

Keep in mind, and embrace the fact, that the client you are working for doesn't "owe" you any hours. It does not matter at this point what was said in the original job posting.

 

Also, you are fortunate to be working for 5 hours per week for this client. Many contractors on Upwork who currently have job at all would gladly take your place if you decide this isn't something you want to continue doing.

Thank you for your feedback but just a few things I don't understand.

 

"Keep in mind, and embrace the fact, that the client you are working for doesn't "owe" you any hours. It does not matter at this point what was said in the original job posting."  I'm to assume that the sole reason freelancers apply or accept a job is because of what the job posting says? I was asked to interview for this. I did not apply. When I saw that based on the job posting it was a full time position I accepted. Just as it is the freelancer's responsability to fulfill the job based on the agreement does it not go the other way? 

 

 

"Also, you are fortunate to be working for 5 hours per week for this client. Many contractors on Upwork who currently have job at all would gladly take your place if you decide this isn't something you want to continue doing."

 

I am not trying to appear ungrateful I'm simply trying to understand how this whole thing works. I will contact the client again and ask about any more work they might need to be done. I was planning on doing that anyway I just wanted to see if this situation has happened to anyone else and if it is deemed "normal" and "acceptable" in the freelance world. 

kirstygibbons
Active Member

Sadly this is something that happens with pretty much every single client - or that’s the experience I have and I have to agree with Preston. You have to weigh up the best way to deal with matters. Whilst Upwork has worked successfully for me there have been times where I have been hugely disappointed. I am always mindful of the fact that there are 101 freelancers lining up for positions. As a freelancer sadly we are very replaceable.



I fixed the issues I was having by talking to the clients though. Sometimes its simply because the clients believe they have more work than they actually do. Some clients are more flexible than others.  With one of my clients I could see it took him a while to get use to having help. I just had a conversation with him and said I know you are busy and listed the things I know I could take off his hands to help him. He appreciated that and I am doing a lot more work for him.



One thing I had to make clear with my clients was if you don't have the hours I cannot drop everything when you do eventually call. They need to understand that you have to prioritize the people that give you regular and consistent work. In some situations saying that the client will move on to the next freelancer. Those that are worth working for though should be pretty understanding. The two I spoke to about this were actually understanding and one of them I have been working with for several months and we get along really well.

 

Good luck with it.



sfw19002
Ace Contributor

Most of my contracts are like this. I'm very up front about my first-in, first-out work queue. Clients who request edits are ahead of new projects. When I take a new project I provide a realistic ETA of first draft or concepts and stick to it.

 

Under promise and over deliver.

 

In the long-run, clients appreciate the honesty and ahead of schedule delivery (from my original ETA). If they need something faster, they hire someone else.

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