Reply
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply

Can't really make a living if you have alot of skills.

petra_r
Community Guru
Petra R Member Since: Aug 3, 2011
11 of 23

@Francisco B wrote:


What are you supposed to do for the rest of the month until you get more credits?


 You could invest that time in improving your profile, adding a portfolio and learning how this site works and how those freelancers who are successful here do it.

 

It would be time well spent.

 

At the moment your profile is poor, and you seem to be bidding on anything and everything in some kind of haphazard feeding frenzy. That could easily kill your freelancing career here before it even started.

 

yitwail
Community Guru
John K Member Since: Feb 17, 2015
12 of 23

@Petra R wrote:

At the moment your profile is poor, and you seem to be bidding on anything and everything in some kind of haphazard feeding frenzy. That could easily kill your freelancing career here before it even started.


 Francisco, you're a rising talent but once you've completed enough jobs to have a Job Success Score, you lose the rising talent badge and the extra connects you get with it, so you should focus on using them more efficiently. And if that's not enough motivation, Upwork can suspend a freelancer permanently if he's too unsuccessful with his proposals.

__________________________________________________
"No good deed goes unpunished." -- Clare Boothe Luce
hospemex
Active Member
Francisco B Member Since: Feb 28, 2017
13 of 23

@John K wrote:

@Petra R wrote:

At the moment your profile is poor, and you seem to be bidding on anything and everything in some kind of haphazard feeding frenzy. That could easily kill your freelancing career here before it even started.


 Francisco, you're a rising talent but once you've completed enough jobs to have a Job Success Score, you lose the rising talent badge and the extra connects you get with it, so you should focus on using them more efficiently. And if that's not enough motivation, Upwork can suspend a freelancer permanently if he's too unsuccessful with his proposals.


 I just lost the badge today. I got nothing. No extra connects or anything.

cupidmedia
Community Guru
Jennifer D Member Since: Feb 15, 2016
14 of 23

@Francisco B wrote:

...

Maybe a level system might work better. Level 1 (1 to 10 billed hours) 60 connects a month. Level 2 (11-30 billed hours) 160 connects a month or something of the like. So at least there is a light at the end of the tunnel.

...


 The problem with this suggestion is that, as freelancers get more successful, their need for connects goes DOWN not up - most of the successful freelancers here in the forum will tell you that they rarely use all their connects, thanks to repeat work and invites.

 

Like Preston said, the most successful freelancers (here in the forum, at least) are the ones with a tight focus in their niche. They are not trying to do everything. Your profile lists a lot of skills, as does your portfolio, and your overview lists other, different skills and is very short. I'm a client in a different field, but even if I was in your field I would probably skip over you because I don't really understand what you can offer me.

sam-sly
Community Guru
Samantha S Member Since: Jun 23, 2016
15 of 23

I am not hyper-specialized either. However, there are reasons that pretty much everyone suggests specialization in most business arenas. It is the most efficient way to be successful if you specialize in something that is in-demand.

 

Think of it this way... A lot of small business owners and staff have to wear many hats.  Some of those things they do well and some not. When they have the budget to outsource, they usually want to send that work to an expert or specialist. So freelancers with a clear specialty have a more obvious unique value and can command higher rates.

 

Also, many business people are skeptical of anyone who claims too many skills. Of course, it is good to have many skills. But when it comes to hiring a professional, you risk running into the "Jack of all trades, master of none." 

 

I think you can include more than one skill if the skills are very closely related to the point that some clients would want someone with that set of skills. Otherwise, it is better to focus on one skill or set of related skills, so you do not look like a Jack of all trades. You can apply to other jobs if you want to. Alternatively, you can build profiles on other platforms to highlight another set of skills. Ultimately it is more efficient to narrow your focus.  

hospemex
Active Member
Francisco B Member Since: Feb 28, 2017
16 of 23

@Samantha S wrote:

Also, many business people are skeptical of anyone who claims too many skills. Of course, it is good to have many skills. But when it comes to hiring a professional, you risk running into the "Jack of all trades, master of none."

 

Almost of the jobs I bid on, are all over the place in skills; so a hyper focused profile might do more damage than good. I believe you have to give the client what he wants and cater to what he's looking for; or you just might specialize your way out of a job.

 

For example: This latest post I am looking at requires Web developmen skills( JavaScript PHP Website Development), Web design skills, and Graphical Designer skills(Adobe Photoshop CSS CSS3 Graphic Design) And this is one of the really tame ones. I have run into ones that reads off a whole list of skills they want in one person.

 

So it's really hard to get onboard with that argument when the clients are demonstrating otherwise.

mtngigi
Community Guru
Virginia F Member Since: Feb 15, 2016
17 of 23

@Francisco B wrote:

@Samantha S wrote:

Also, many business people are skeptical of anyone who claims too many skills. Of course, it is good to have many skills. But when it comes to hiring a professional, you risk running into the "Jack of all trades, master of none."

 

Almost of the jobs I bid on, are all over the place in skills; so a hyper focused profile might do more damage than good. I believe you have to give the client what he wants and cater to what he's looking for; or you just might specialize your way out of a job.

 

For example: This latest post I am looking at requires Web developmen skills( JavaScript PHP Website Development), Web design skills, and Graphical Designer skills(Adobe Photoshop CSS CSS3 Graphic Design) And this is one of the really tame ones. I have run into ones that reads off a whole list of skills they want in one person.

 

So it's really hard to get onboard with that argument when the clients are demonstrating otherwise.


No ... it's not hard. Those are the kinds of clients who are clueless about who can do what, and for the most part will settle for mediocracy. Those are the kinds of jobs most of us wouldn't give a second look at.

hospemex
Active Member
Francisco B Member Since: Feb 28, 2017
18 of 23

@Virginia F wrote:

No ... it's not hard. Those are the kinds of clients who are clueless about who can do what, and for the most part will settle for mediocracy. Those are the kinds of jobs most of us wouldn't give a second look at.


 Now you are trying to train the clients as well. It is what is it is. We can talk about a utopian society with utopian clients, but we are not actually living in that world. So what I do in those cases are send a proposal where I say I have X skills, but not X skills, but do not believe that that will hinder me in completing the project because I have done this before, blah, blah, blah. But to ignore clients because they don't know how to properly write up their needs is turning away business, to me.  You might see it from a different point of view, and I understand that everyone is supposed to be perfect in how they present their needs, but it does not make sense to me to ignore those jobs.

hospemex
Active Member
Francisco B Member Since: Feb 28, 2017
19 of 23

@Virginia F wrote:



No ... it's not hard. Those are the kinds of clients who are clueless about who can do what, and for the most part will settle for mediocracy. Those are the kinds of jobs most of us wouldn't give a second look at.


Now you are trying to train the clients as well. It is what is it is. We can talk about a utopian society with utopian clients, but we are not actually living in that world. So what I do in those cases are send a proposal where I say I have X skills, but not X skills, but do not believe that that will hinder me in completing the project because I have done this before, blah, blah, blah. But to ignore clients because they don't know how to properly write up their needs is turning away business, to me.  You might see it from a different point of view, and I understand that everyone is supposed to be perfect in how they present their needs, but it does not make sense to me to ignore those jobs.

 

P.S. I think I am doing something wrong as my posts are disappearing.

colettelewis
Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
20 of 23

@Francisco B wrote:

 

P.S. I think I am doing something wrong as my posts are disappearing.


 Your posts may not have completely disappeared, sometimes they get moved to other threads. So if you check your posts history, you might find them again. (no guarantee thoughSmiley Wink)