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Extra fast translation

luce-neidert
Community Guru
Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
11 of 19

Saeed N wrote:
Well, in this case I personally grant them the credit of being honest and upfront.

I don't think they are. If they say they need to have some machine translation checked, no-one in their right mind will accept the job. Only naive would be translators will be fooled by the document as a native speaker you can always tell a machine translation. It looks like some Martian trying to speak a language, that's what it looks like. And it was done extra fast. On average, it takes me a day to translate 2000 words.

jr-translation
Community Guru
Jennifer R Member Since: Sep 15, 2017
12 of 19

Luce N wrote:

This is very suspicious. Yesterday evening, this client was offering an IDEAL FOR NEWCOMER English French translation job. Short dialogues, 15 000 to 17 000 words. They must have found a very efficient translator, as the same company is now offering another IDEAL FOR NEWCOMER job, this time it's proofreading the 15 000 to 17 000 words.

 

In my opinion, they've just decided it was cheaper to have some machine translation do the job and now want some naive newcomer to spend hours checking it.

 

I have noticed that more and more clients are offering this type of proofreading : they use some CAT to have a "translation done", they expect someone to go over it for cheap. I myself use a CAT and know that unless it's supervised by someone that knows what they're doing, a CAT translation is worthless.

 

And now I wonder if I should spend some connects to inform those "smart" clients that translators haven't been replaced by machine translators yet.


I have identifies several top rates translators that deliver poorly edited machine translation on a regular basis and you can even see in their portfolio. As long as clients accept their work and leave 5* feedbacks there is not a lot we can do about that either.

 

I warn clients if they are in contact with me already but do not waste conntects. Some clients just believe they can save money by accepting the lowest bid. Just wait until something seriously backfires. Not to long ago a proofread a patent translation done by one of my special friends. "33 µm at 22.000 Hz" was translated "22.000 µm at 33 Hz" just like google has told the translator. I was too busy to do the translation myself but was invited to an interview, that's how I managed to warn the client.

 

Did you see the ad on YT by one of these freelance platforms that implies that the client only has to hire a few freelancers to get a small app that can translate? I guess it was a bot that came up with the idea to replace humans with a few programmed lines.

luce-neidert
Community Guru
Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
13 of 19

Jennifer R wrote:

Luce N wrote:

This is very suspicious. Yesterday evening, this client was offering an IDEAL FOR NEWCOMER English French translation job. Short dialogues, 15 000 to 17 000 words. They must have found a very efficient translator, as the same company is now offering another IDEAL FOR NEWCOMER job, this time it's proofreading the 15 000 to 17 000 words.

 

In my opinion, they've just decided it was cheaper to have some machine translation do the job and now want some naive newcomer to spend hours checking it.

 

I have noticed that more and more clients are offering this type of proofreading : they use some CAT to have a "translation done", they expect someone to go over it for cheap. I myself use a CAT and know that unless it's supervised by someone that knows what they're doing, a CAT translation is worthless.

 

And now I wonder if I should spend some connects to inform those "smart" clients that translators haven't been replaced by machine translators yet.


I have identifies several top rates translators that deliver poorly edited machine translation on a regular basis and you can even see in their portfolio. As long as clients accept their work and leave 5* feedbacks there is not a lot we can do about that either.

 

I warn clients if they are in contact with me already but do not waste conntects. Some clients just believe they can save money by accepting the lowest bid. Just wait until something seriously backfires. Not to long ago a proofread a patent translation done by one of my special friends. "33 µm at 22.000 Hz" was translated "22.000 µm at 33 Hz" just like google has told the translator. I was too busy to do the translation myself but was invited to an interview, that's how I managed to warn the client.

 

Did you see the ad on YT by one of these freelance platforms that implies that the client only has to hire a few freelancers to get a small app that can translate? I guess it was a bot that came up with the idea to replace humans with a few programmed lines.


Hi Jennyfer! No, I haven't seen this very interesting ad. Loking forward to it!

 

I recenty spoke to a doctor who told me about instructions on how to take a medicine that made no sense - probably machine translated. We (translators) really need to stop that foolishness!

colettelewis
Community Guru
Nichola L Member Since: Mar 13, 2015
14 of 19

One of the most time-consuming jobs I know is to "proofread" a machine-translated text. And, IMO, one of the most expensive.  

 

luce-neidert
Community Guru
Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
15 of 19

Here's another story to show how terrible the situation is:

 

Recently, I answered an offer for translation of a small book. I told the client I needed to know how many words were involved to make a bid. This person was nice enough to send me the document. 17744 words. I don't know about you, but to me that could take up to 9 days of work.

 

The client was offering $200. He received bids between $200 and $60. Suddenly, I noticed the job was no longer available, so I contacted the guy, hoping that he had not chosen some cheapo that would end up using machine translation. He answered that he had found someone who seemed all right.

 

Next day, the client contacted me again. The translation was ready (80 pages) and the quality was not what he had expected (he happens to speak French, which he had said in his offer, so he could judge it right away). We, translators, really have to fight these stupid machine translation users who don't even know what translation means.

atlinguist
Community Guru
Alexandra H Member Since: Jul 30, 2015
16 of 19

I was asked to participate in a survey recently and got annoyed because two questions were left untranslated and a term most machines get wrong was there as well. (Needless to say, the whole thing looked machine-translated, but it's what I would expect nowadays.) 

 

Guess what I did. (And let me tell you that I am not foolish or particularly brave.) I wrote to the company, a big multi-national, telling them about it and offering to 'help out' next time. Ha!

 

Did I make a fool of myself, do you think? 

luce-neidert
Community Guru
Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
17 of 19

Alexandra H wrote:

I was asked to participate in a survey recently and got annoyed because two questions were left untranslated and a term most machines get wrong was there as well. (Needless to say, the whole thing looked machine-translated, but it's what I would expect nowadays.) 

 

Guess what I did. (And let me tell you that I am not foolish or particularly brave.) I wrote to the company, a big multi-national, telling them about it and offering to 'help out' next time. Ha!

 

Did I make a fool of myself, do you think? 


Not at all! We (translators) have to fight to make people understand what translation is. Well done, Alexandra! Let me know if that company contacts you!

katerinasamara
Ace Contributor
Katerina S Member Since: May 28, 2019
18 of 19

Hello! I was looking around the forum and found this topic quite interesting!

I think you did the right thing Alexandra! They obviously need your services and didn't know it!
They were the ones who made a fool of themselves by putting out such poor writing for others to see. It's funny because people usually go through a lot of effort to write stuff properly and proofread it (or pay someone to do it) so that it's correct. So why would you ruin all that with a bad translation? If the translation doesn't make sense then it has the same result as you writing a poor text in the first place!

 

In the case of the doctor that was mentioned before and the badly translated medicine instructions - is that even allowed? Like do the manufacturers not have to check that what they're selling is safe? Because wrong instructions on a medicine bottle can be as bad as having the wrong name written on it!

luce-neidert
Community Guru
Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
19 of 19

Katerina S wrote:

Hello! I was looking around the forum and found this topic quite interesting!

I think you did the right thing Alexandra! They obviously need your services and didn't know it!
They were the ones who made a fool of themselves by putting out such poor writing for others to see. It's funny because people usually go through a lot of effort to write stuff properly and proofread it (or pay someone to do it) so that it's correct. So why would you ruin all that with a bad translation? If the translation doesn't make sense then it has the same result as you writing a poor text in the first place!

 

In the case of the doctor that was mentioned before and the badly translated medicine instructions - is that even allowed? Like do the manufacturers not have to check that what they're selling is safe? Because wrong instructions on a medicine bottle can be as bad as having the wrong name written on it!


Hi Katerina, I myself find it rather hard to believe that even laboratories are using the wrong kind of "translators", but who knows? My neighbour, who happens to be a doctor, told me about it twice, so there's a good chance it really happened. When money is involved, anything is possible, I'm afraid!

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