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Re: What does translator mean on Upwork?

Community Guru
Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
11 of 40

Well, Moujahed, that's what I usually do, as I've been on Upwork for a few years. However, what really got me furious about the client I was referring to is that he is from a wealthy country and his offer seemed to be done by an "educated" person, working for a decent type of company. 

 

And he's not the first to tell me that he'd love to work with me but he's found some bimbo that charges 4 times less than me or something like that. Now, after my experiment, I know what type of "translator" he's referring too.

 

Please note that I'm not the one that tried to convince him about my rates, he's the one that took the time to contact me again to try to bargain.

Active Member
Moujahed J Member Since: Feb 12, 2019
12 of 40

As I said, Luce, don't take it personally. Everyone can have their own reasons. Choosing to pay for cheaper work has its own risks and plenty of frustration in the process. I can understand that losing a client might be difficult. Think of it from a business perspective. You should not lower your rates to please your clients. If they get the impression that you are ready to do that, they can use it against you. There are very demanding clients that won't be happy no matter what you do. Stay away from them.

 

I remembered a similar situation with a client who had chosen to hire someone else then eventually come back to work with me because he’d had a terrible experience paying for crappy work with lack of support. It might not always happen, but there is nothing that should stop you from moving on. No hard feelings. There are plenty of good clients that you can reach here. Give it some time, Good luck!

Community Guru
Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
13 of 40

Well, if I'm still using Upwork, it means that I've found decent clients. But I wish there were some way to stop people who have no idea what translation means to offer their services as translators. I know this won't happen, but who knows, someone might get a hint about what translation is by reading this post...

Community Guru
Jennifer R Member Since: Sep 15, 2017
14 of 40

Luce N wrote:

Well, if I'm still using Upwork, it means that I've found decent clients. But I wish there were some way to stop people who have no idea what translation means to offer their services as translators. I know this won't happen, but who knows, someone might get a hint about what translation is by reading this post...


I only joined Upwork sometime in 2017 after I decided that I studied translation to be a translator not a technical writer. One of the first lecture at university was that everybody can call themself a translator so you have to stand out in some way. Back then I am lucky that I could study engineering as well. Since then I was luckely also able to learn some less common languages allowing me to bid in a less competative market.

 

With all these specialized profiles it would be great if Upwork would allow to differenciate between professional translators and google users.

Last week a client invited me to an interview for a very urgend translation Swedish to German. I was on the bus and send a quick reply with a relatively low rate (2ct less then outside Upwork) and she wrote "Missy, you have to reconsider your rates. You are too expensive." My reply: "This Missy is one of the few translators on Upwork with a university degree in translation."

Community Guru
Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
15 of 40

Jennifer, and you can consider yourself lucky because you are one of the lucky ones that translates into a language where there is not that much competition. I wish I had been able to master the "der/die/das" and all the rest, but it was a bit too much for me.

Community Guru
Jennifer R Member Since: Sep 15, 2017
16 of 40

Luce N wrote:

Jennifer, and you can consider yourself lucky because you are one of the lucky ones that translates into a language where there is not that much competition. I wish I had been able to master the "der/die/das" and all the rest, but it was a bit too much for me.


No, German sucks because there are millions of wannabe translators that had English at school and believe that they are good enough to translate. Then there are all the non-native speaker that cannot get one sentence straight and claim there German is fluent.
I had 6 years of Latin at school and still am only average on this stupid UW German grammar test. Next time I only choose my replies randomly instead of pointing out all the mistakes.

I am lucky because I decided to move to Norway some 6 years ago. It it one of the worst places to live if you are selfemployed and compete with the rest of the world instead of only local companies, but there are not too many Germans that know Norwegian, Swedish, or Danish.

Community Guru
Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
17 of 40

English, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish and German. Not bad.

 

 

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Community Guru
Jennifer R Member Since: Sep 15, 2017
18 of 40

Luce N wrote:

English, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish and German. Not bad.


I also have a degreen in translating Spanish with focus on engineering. 

Luckely, Norwegian, Swedish, and Danish are very alike. When I first arrived I said Norwegans write Danish and speak Swedish. This article discribes the situation quite well. It is a bit like thowing Spanish and Italians in one room. Make sure you know the typical differences (otto=ocho, latte=leche, notte=noche), profile words (nonna=abuela), and false friends (barato =cheated vs cheap). You can also try to get French into the mix now.

Community Guru
Luce N Member Since: Oct 9, 2016
19 of 40

My specialty: Latin languages. French, Brazilian Portuguese (I spent my childhood in Brazil and also took Portuguese at University). Obviously I understand Spanish, which I also studied in highschool and I can usually guess Italian. Just like you, I had to study Latin for many years...

 

I tried to study German, and I understand basic German, but again, the "der/die/das" is above me! 

 

At one point, I also studied Hebrew, because it's completely different from all the languages I'm familiar with. Writing Hebrew was rather hard to learn, but I had fun. Now, I look at the notes I wrote on the two books I used to study the language, but can't remember anything. All that good work gone to the dogs.

 

Community Guru
Jennifer R Member Since: Sep 15, 2017
20 of 40

I just go this reply from a client outside UW that offers €0.02/word (less for repetitions):

 

...we specialized in translation company for more than 15 years... this order at least 10,000 words.

 

Please keep in mind that most of our projects / orders are ONLY involved user manuals of electric/electronic devices (that’s to say, though the rate that we offer seems “low”, you can certainly get rewarded “decently” because our documentations / orders often contain lots of similar terms / expressions and syntax, that’s to say, focus on a limited area and are coming only from the same several clients, which are much easier than legal or literary documents. Thus, you can translate faster and faster with a better and better working efficiency, that’s to say, the time and effort spent on a 3,000-word translation job from us will be ALMOST the same as that spent on a 1,000-word job from your current clients.

 

In addition, if your translation is of high quality and cost effective, we shall treat you as our core translator/partner and place with you many orders (i.e. we can build a long-term and stable working relation in the future). I hope that the terms and conditions offered by us will interest and attract you.

 

Any consideratin from you will be highly appreciated.

 

 

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