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Re: Just Wondering

Ace Contributor
Kendra B Member Since: Sep 25, 2018
1 of 12

Are there any programming / web development gigs that would hire someone with a background in creative writing and no experience programming? I'm assuming the answer to this question is "no," but I thought I would ask anyway.

 

The few programmers I've spoken to told me that they taught themselves what they know, though, so maybe I could learn those skills, too? 

 

I'm interested in getting training for programming or web development but I'm not exactly sure what skills I need. I just know that it's an in demand field, and having those skills might be a way to another full-time job. 

 

I've thought about maybe signing up for a "bootcamp" style course, but I'm not sure what specific skills I need to teach myself to make a living doing this. 

Community Leader
Md. Morshed A Member Since: Apr 3, 2018
2 of 12

the programming sector is way too much populated right now but we are living in the golden age of programming. There is lot to do and still there are lots of new languages coming by. And each and every language have an unique advantage and all of them are career builder.

 

Even if you know HTML only, you can make fortune with that if you are lucky. For you, my suggestion is, start right away with HTML, CSS I mean the basic stage. If you want to be a web developer then soon you will find out which programming language is good for you.

 

I learned PHP and after learnign that I received an order from the local market of my country to create a website for job circuler. Where people can signup and create CV which must be supported in the MS Word if they download it.

 

Now guess, how in the world I'm gonna create a MS Word supported CV format with PHP? In this case it is 100% necessary to use code from C# (Sharp). But I don't know C#, I learned PHP!

 

Why I'm telling this? Bcoz you cannot achieve everything with a single language. So there is no specific choice. You have to learn everything you need. Not all of it, only what necessary.

Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
3 of 12

Kendra:

Clients hire programmers based on what the programmer can do for them.

Nobody cares about the programmer's "background" or if they previousy did "creative writing."

 

What matters is what you can do right now.

 

Obviously you can't offer your services in an area for which you do not yet have the requisite skills.

 

Here's a secret to learning programming: You can't actually learn to program in a void. You need a goal. you need a project that YOU want to create. If you have a goal in mind, something you want to accomplish -- a specific program, a web application, mobile app, etc. -- then you can learn to program by learning what it takes to accomplish that goal.

Active Member
Vladimir S Member Since: Nov 1, 2016
4 of 12

I agree as well, I don`t know any other faster way to learn a language or a framework without practicing at least on a couple of projects.

Ace Contributor
Kendra B Member Since: Sep 25, 2018
5 of 12

I've started with taking a few free programming classes and trying to make simple games. I feel like I'm learning a few things, but I'm a little upset with how slow everything is going, though. Plus, I'm not really sure how I would apply my skills to help potential clients right now. 

 

I'm also wondering if it's time for me to look for practice projects, and, if so, where should I look for practice projects? I want to add to my portfolio so that I can eventually prove to myself and prospective clients that I know what I'm doing. 

Community Guru
Preston H Member Since: Nov 24, 2014
6 of 12

re: "I've started with taking a few free programming classes and trying to make simple games. I feel like I'm learning a few things, but I'm a little upset with how slow everything is going, though. Plus, I'm not really sure how I would apply my skills to help potential clients right now. I'm also wondering if it's time for me to look for practice projects, and, if so, where should I look for practice projects? I want to add to my portfolio so that I can eventually prove to myself and prospective clients that I know what I'm doing."

 

Sorry, but I don't think you can really learn programming that way.

 

You didn't really pay any attention to what people in this thread were telling you.


Until there is something that YOU want to create, I don't think you'll make any headway.

Community Leader
Md. Morshed A Member Since: Apr 3, 2018
7 of 12

You told us, you wanted to be a web developer, why are you taking classes for game development? Learning throug classes is a very boring process. You have to learn programming via projects.

Active Member
Muhammad H Member Since: Nov 2, 2018
8 of 12

Well in today's world, the first thing that matters is your skills and not your background. I you can do it, and you can develop what the client is asking for, you are going great. If not, you need to re-visit your skills and update it according to market needs. Degree, background, etc comes very late, the first thing is your skills, and that's too "Relevent Skills".

 

Happy Coding. 

Highlighted
Ace Contributor
Kendra B Member Since: Sep 25, 2018
9 of 12

I think most of you said I should start by making small projects. Do you have any idea where or how I should get started teaching myself based on what clients really want? Sorry if this was already addressed, but I'm pretty new to this, save for one class I had in college that I've probably forgotten about by now, and I agree that traditional code language learning isn't that effective. 

 

I thought about signing up for Free Code Camp, but is there anything else you would recommend? Like I said, sorry if this was already addressed; I'll go back and read the previous replies. 

Community Guru
Richard W Member Since: Jun 22, 2017
10 of 12

Kendra, I don't agree with those who've said you should start by having a project you want to do. Even if you did have a particular project in mind, how would you know which technologies you needed to learn for that project, or whether it was suitable for a beginner? Of course, if you did have a burning desire to implement a particular project, it might make sense to pursue it and overcome those obstacles. But as you're not in that position and it sounds like you're effectively a complete beginner, I would recommend starting with any short introductory programming course, to learn the very basics and see whether programming suits you. Once you've done one short course, you'll be better equipped to choose your next one. Expect this to be part of a continuing process. A single course is not going to make you a programmer.